11 January 2016

Juris Diversitas Conference: CALL FOR PAPERS PROLONGED

2016 Annual Conference: 
Unity and/or Diversity

May 30 to June 1, 2016
Louisiana State University Law Center, USA

 Still time to submit, do not miss the event!



Theme: Comparative legal studies have long been perceived as an
 engine pulling legal traditions and systems towards 
convergence, harmonization, and unification. Today, legal pluralism 
pushes towards the recognition of human and social diversity. 
Does this mean that we have to choose between unity and 
diversity, Jus unum or juris diversitas?  To what extent do pluralistic 
societies embrace or reject harmonization and uniformity, 
or simply ignore them? Do we unify or add layers, increasing the 
complexity of legal orders? Does history reflect a move from 
diversity to unity or an ongoing conflict between the two? What 
makes unity successful or sustainable? This is an invitation to 
discuss, in an interdisciplinary way, the development of laws and 
social norms, in the dialectical tension between the ontological 
unity of human beings and mankind and the plurality of individual 
aspirations and social arrangements.

Submissions: Panel proposals are strongly
encouraged, as is the participation of doctoral students and
scholars from outside the discipline of law. While parallel sessions
of three twenty-minute presentations will be used, we 
encourage more original session structures.

Proposals should be in English or in French. Proposals of 
circa 250 words (or 1000 words for panel proposals) should 
be submitted to Professor Salvatore Mancuso at 
JDLSU2016@gmail.com by January 31, 2016 
with a short biography listing major or relevant publications. 
Make this a single Word document with minimal formatting, 
so that proposal and biography can be copied easily into 
the conference program.

Registration fees: €200 or €125 for Juris Diversitas members paid up 
for 2016. Membership and fee payment information is available on 
the Juris Diversitas Blog (http://jurisdiversitas.blogspot.com/). 
Note that fees don’t cover travel, accommodation, or the 
conference dinner (€50).

07 January 2016

NEW FROM MCGILL-QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY PRESS

From Treaties to Reserves
The Federal Government and Native Peoples
in Territorial Alberta, 1870-1905 

   
D.J. HALL


How divergent understandings of treaties contributed to a heritage of distrust.
  
Though some believe that the Indian treaties of the 1870s achieved a unity of purpose between the Canadian government and First Nations, in From Treaties to Reserves D.J. Hall asserts that - as a result of profound cultural differences - each side interpreted the negotiations differently, leading to conflict and an acute sense of betrayal when neither group accomplished what the other had asked. 

Hall explores the original intentions behind the government's policies, illustrates their attempts at cooperation, and clarifies their actions. While the government believed that the Aboriginal peoples of what is now southern and central Alberta desired rapid change, the First Nations, in contrast, believed that the government was committed to supporting the preservation of their culture while they adapted to change. Government policies intended to motivate backfired, leading instead to poverty, starvation, and cultural restriction. Many policies were also culturally insensitive, revealing misconceptions of Aboriginal people as lazy and over-dependent on government rations. Yet the first two decades of reserve life still witnessed most First Nations people participating in reserve economies, many of the first generation of reserve-born children graduated from schools with some improved ability to cope with reserve life, and there was also more positive cooperation between government and First Nations people than is commonly acknowledged.

D.J. Hall 
is professor emeritus of Canadian history at the University of Alberta.

 Click here to learn more or order a copy of the book 

14 December 2015

11 December 2015

Baltimore Conference on The Fate of Scholarship in American Law Schools

CONFERENCE: The Fate of Scholarship in American Law Schools 

March 31-April 1, 2016

The University of Baltimore School of Law will host this groundbreaking conference   on March 31 and April 1, 2016, at UB’s landmark new John and Frances Angelos Law Center in midtown Baltimore.
As American legal education faces an identity crisis, what will become of scholarship in U.S. law schools? Will it survive the tumult – should it survive – and in what form?
The conference will reexamine first principles of legal scholarship – its value (to legal education, to the legal profession, to society) and its essential aspects – and will survey particular issues of contemporary concern, including emerging scholarly forms and technologies and the relationship among legal scholarship, journalism and new media.
The two-day conference will consist of themed plenary sessions, concurrent small-group sessions, opportunities to interact informally and a keynote address by Jack M. Balkin Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School.
Questions and sponsorship interest may be directed to the conference organizer, UB School of Law Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship C.J. Peters , at cpeters@ubalt.edu  or410.837.4509.
Online registration for the conference will be available soon. Watch this space for more information.

08 December 2015

Weaving Intellectual Property Policy in Small Island Developing States

Weaving Intellectual Property Policy in Small Island Developing States

Miranda Forsyth and Sue Farran

September 2015 | ISBN 978-1-78068-225-9 | xiv + 280 pp. | paperback

62 euros | 74 US dollars | 59 GB pounds

This book considers the challenges of creating appropriate intellectual property frameworks in developing economies. It focuses on the small island states of the Pacific region to explore and illustrate the many dilemmas, drawing together considerations of policy, theories of development and law, and empirical studies to suggest solutions and possible strategies.


read more...


07 December 2015

Juris Diversitas Appel à communications: nouvelle date (8 janvier 2016)

APPEL À COMMUNICATIONS
JURIS DIVERSITAS
CONGRÈS ANNUEL  
Du 30 mai au 1er juin, 2016
Louisiana State University
Law Center, Baton Rouge, États-Unis

Unité et/ou Diversité
Colloque international et interdisciplinaire de droit comparé

Thème : Les études juridiques comparatives ont longtemps été perçues comme un moteur de convergence, d’harmonisation et d’unification des traditions et des systèmes juridiques. Le pluralisme juridique met aujourd’hui l’accent sur la reconnaissance de la diversité humaine et sociale. Faut-il pour autant conclure que nous devons choisir entre unité et diversité, jus unum ou juris diversitas ? Dans quelle mesure les sociétés pluralistes embrassent-elles ou rejettent-elles l’harmonisation et l’uniformité, ou les ignorent-elles tout simplement ? Unifions-nous vraiment ou ajoutons-nous un niveau supplémentaire de complexité juridique ? L’histoire révèle-t-elle un mouvement de la diversité vers l’unité ou un conflit entre les deux ? À quelles conditions l’unité est-elle une réussite durable ? Ce colloque est une invitation à une discussion interdisciplinaire du développement du droit et des normes sociales, pris dans la tension dialectique entre l’unité ontologique des êtres humains et de l’humanité et la pluralité des aspirations individuelles et des arrangements sociaux.

Communications : Les propositions de tables rondes et présentations interdisciplinaires sont encouragées, de même que la participation de doctorants et d’universitaires non juristes. En plus des sessions parallèles avec trois orateurs parlant chacun vingt minutes, les organisateurs invitent à une organisation plus originale.
Les propositions, en anglais ou en français, de 250 mots environ (ou 1.000 pour une table ronde) sont à adresser au Pr Salvatore Mancuso (JDLSU2016@gmail.com) avant le 8 janvier 2016 avec une brève notice biographique. Merci de composer la proposition et la notice biographique dans un seul document Word, avec le minimum de mise en forme, pour faciliter la composition du programme.


Droits d’inscription : €200 ou €125 pour les membres de Juris Diversitas à jour de leur cotisation pour 2016. Les informations relatives à l’adhésion et l’inscription sont disponibles sur http://jurisdiversitas.blogspot.com/. Les droits ne couvrent pas les frais de voyage et de logement, ni le banquet du congrès (€50).

Juris Diversitas Call for Papers: Time Extension (January 8, 2016)

CALL FOR PAPERS
JURIS DIVERSITAS
ANNUAL CONFERENCE  
May 30 - June 1, 2016
Louisiana State University
Law Center, Baton Rouge, USA


Unity and/or Diversity
An International, Interdisciplinary Conference on Comparative Law

Theme: Comparative legal studies have long been perceived as an engine pulling legal traditions and systems towards convergence, harmonization, and unification. Today, legal pluralism pushes towards the recognition of human and social diversity. Does this mean that we have to choose between unity and diversity, Jus unum or juris diversitas?  To what extent do pluralistic societies embrace or reject harmonization and uniformity, or simply ignore them? Do we unify or add layers, increasing the complexity of legal orders? Does history reflect a move from diversity to unity or an ongoing conflict between the two? What makes unity successful or sustainable? This is an invitation to discuss, in an interdisciplinary way, the development of laws and social norms, in the dialectical tension between the ontological unity of human beings and mankind and the plurality of individual aspirations and social arrangements.

Submissions: Panel proposals and interdisciplinary presentations are strongly encouraged, as is the participation of doctoral students and scholars from outside of the discipline of law. While parallel sessions of three twenty-minute presentations will be used, we encourage more original session structures.

Proposals should be in English or in French. Proposals of circa 250 words (or 1000 words for panel proposals) should be submitted to Professor Salvatore Mancuso at JDLSU2016@gmail.com by January 8, 2016, with a short biography listing major or relevant publications. Make this a single Word document with minimal formatting, so that proposal and biography can be copied easily into the conference program.

Registration fees: €200 or €125 for Juris Diversitas members paid up for 2016. Membership and fee payment information is available on the Juris Diversitas Blog (http://jurisdiversitas.blogspot.com/). Note that fees don’t cover travel, accommodation, or the conference dinner (€50).

18 November 2015

ARTICLES WANTED: Comparative Legal History, the official journal of the European Society for Comparative Legal History

Articles are being sought for publication in Comparative Legal History. The journal is published by Taylor & Francis (UK), both online and in print, twice a year:
 
Articles … explore both internal legal history (doctrinal and disciplinary developments in the law) and external legal history (legal ideas and institutions in wider contexts). Rooted in the complexity of the various Western legal traditions worldwide, the journal will also investigate other laws and customs from around the globe. Comparisons may be either temporal or geographical and both legal and other law-like normative traditions will be considered. Scholarship on comparative and trans-national historiography, including trans-disciplinary approaches, is particularly welcome.

Comparative Legal History is the official journal of the European Society for Comparative Legal History (ESCLH). The Society’s membership fees include a subscription to the journal.

The Editors welcome scholarly submissions in the English language:

To submit an article, please contact Articles Editor Heikki Pihlajamäki (heikki.pihlajamaki@helsinki.fi). The optimal length for articles is between 7500 to 15000 words, including footnotes. All articles are submitted to double blind peer review.

To propose a review, please contact Reviews Editor Agustín Parise (agustin.parise@maastrichtuniversity.nl). Book reviews will generally range from 1500 to 2500 words. Review articles will also be considered.

Potential contributors should pay special attention to the ‘Instructions for Authors’. In particular, contributors whose first language is not English should have their papers edited by native Anglophone scholars in advance of their submission to ensure a clear presentation of their ideas and an accurate appraisal of their work.

Spread the word. 

17 November 2015

The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice’ by Benjamin Spagnolo

Hart Publishing is delighted to announce the publication of
‘The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice’ by Benjamin Spagnolo

We are pleased to offer you 20% discount on the book

To order online with your 20% discount please click on the link below the title and then click on the ‘pay now’ button on the right hand side of the screen. Once through to the ordering screen type ref: CV7 in the voucher code field and click ‘apply’

Alternatively, please contact Hart Publishing’s distributor, Macmillan Distribution Limited, by telephone or email (details below) quoting ref: CV7

The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice
by Benjamin Spagnolo

The Continuity of Legal Systems in Theory and Practice examines a persistent and fascinating question about the continuity of legal systems: when is a legal system existing at one time the same legal system that exists at another time?

The book's distinctive approach to this question is to combine abstract critical analysis of two of the most developed theories of legal systems, those of Hans Kelsen and Joseph Raz, with an evaluation of their capacity, in practice, to explain the facts, attitudes and normative standards for which they purport to account. That evaluation is undertaken by reference to Australian constitutional law and history, whose diverse and complex phenomena make it particularly apt for evaluating the theories’ explanatory power.

In testing whether the depiction of Australian law presented by each theory achieves an adequate ‘fit’ with historical facts, the book also contributes to the understanding of Australian law and legal systems between 1788 and 2001. By collating the relevant Australian materials systematically for the first time, it presents the case for reconceptualising the role of Imperial laws and institutions during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and clarifies the interrelationship between Colonial, State, Commonwealth and Imperial legal systems both before and after Federation.

Benjamin Spagnolo is the Penningtons Student (Fellow) and Tutor in Law at Christ Church, Oxford.


BOOK DETAILS
October 2015   9781849468831    280pp   Hbk   RSP: £58
20% Discount Price: £46.40

If you would like to place an order you can do so through the Hart Publishing website (link below). To receive the discount, please click on the ‘pay now’ button on the right hand side of the screen. Once through to the ordering screen type ref: CV7 in the voucher code field and click ‘apply’.

Alternatively, please contact Hart Publishing’s Distributor, Macmillan Distribution Limited, by telephone or e-mail and quote reference CV7 when placing your order.

Macmillan Distribution (MDL), Brunel Road, Houndmills, Basingstoke, RG21 6XS, UK

UK ORDERS: Tel: +44 (0)1256 302692    Fax: +44 (0)1256 812521 / 812558      E-mail: direct@macmillan.co.uk

EU AND ROW ORDERS: Tel: +44 (0)1256 329242    Fax: +44 (0)1256 842084    E-mail: export@macmillan.co.uk



16 November 2015

Judicial Decision-Making in a Globalised World

NEW AS PAPERBACK
Judicial Decision-Making in a Globalised World
A Comparative Analysis of the Changing Practices of Western Highest Courts
Elaine Mak

Reviews
‘...the reviewers strongly suggest the reading of this brilliant book which has all the qualities for becoming a "must-read" for...scholars and practitioners,It is a very meticulous and welcome, but specialized, addition to the globalization of law literature...’
Suzanne Comtois and Mauro Zamboni, Canadian Journal of Administrative Law and Practice

‘…the virtues of this book are many…[it] contributes importantly to what I hope will be a growing field of “trans-Atlantic” studies.,Mak’s comparative study offers a significant contribution to the scholarship on the use of foreign legal materials in legal developments. The close scrutiny of the inner workings of the highest courts also make it a welcome addition to the field of comparative judicial studies. The book certainly merits attention from both lawyers and political scientists.’
Martin Shapiro, Law and Politics Book Review

Why do judges study legal sources that originated outside their own national legal system, and how do they use arguments from these sources in deciding domestic cases? Based on interviews with judges, this book presents the inside story of how judges engage with international and comparative law in the highest courts of the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, France and the Netherlands. A comparative analysis of the views and experiences of the judges clarifies how the decision-making of these Western courts has developed in light of the internationalisation of law and the increased opportunities for transnational judicial communication. While the qualitative analysis reveals the motives that judges claim for using foreign law and the influence of 'globalist' and 'localist' approaches to judging, the author also finds suggestions of a convergence of practices between the courts that are the subject of this study. This empirical analysis is complemented by a constitutional-theoretical inquiry into the procedural and substantive factors of legal evolution, which enable or constrain the development and possible convergence of highest courts' practices. The two strands of the analysis are connected in a final contextual reflection on the future development of the role of Western highest courts.

Elaine Mak is Professor of Empirical Study of Public Law, in particular of Rule-of-Law Institutions, at the Erasmus University Rotterdam.


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